A logic model is a graphic depiction of how a project translates its resources into activities and outcomes. The ATE Project Logic Model Template presents the basic format for a logic model with question prompts and examples  to guide users in distilling their project plans into succinct statements about planned activities and products and desired outcomes. Paying attention to the prompts and ATE-specific examples will help users avoid common logic model mistakes, like placing outputs (tangible products) under outcomes (changes in people, organizations or conditions brought about through project activities and outputs).

The template is in PowerPoint so you may use the existing elements and start creating your own logic model right away—just delete the instructional parts of the document and input your project’s information.  We have found that when a document has several graphic elements, PowerPoint is easier to work in than Word.  Alternatively, you could create a simple table in Word that mirrors the layout in the template.

Formatting tips:

  • If you find you need special paper to print the logic model and maintain its legibility, it’s too complicated.  It should be readable on a 8.5” x 11” sheet of paper.  If you simply have too much information to include in a single page, include general summary statements/categories, and include detailed explanations in a proposal narrative or other project planning document.
  • You may wish to add arrows to connect specific activities to specific outputs or outcomes.  However, if you find that all activities are leading to all outcomes (and that is actually how the project is intended to work), there is no need to clutter your model with arrows leading everywhere.
  • Use a consistent font and font size.
  • Align, align, align! Alignment is one of the most important design principles. When logic model elements are out of alignment, it can make it seem messy and unprofessional.
  • Don’t worry if your logic model doesn’t capture all the subtle nuances of your project. It should provide an overview of what a project does and is intended to accomplish and  convey a clear logic as to how the pieces are connected.  Your proposal narrative or project plan is where the details go.

Download the template from http://bit.ly/lm-temp.

About the Authors

Lori Wingate

Lori Wingate box with arrow

Executive Director, The Evaluation Center, Western Michigan University

Lori has a Ph.D. in evaluation and more than 20 years of experience in the field of program evaluation. She is co-principal investigator of EvaluATE and leads and a variety of evaluation projects at WMU focused on STEM education, health, and higher education initiatives. Dr. Wingate has led numerous webinars and workshops on evaluation in a variety of contexts, including CDC University and the American Evaluation Association Summer Evaluation Institute. She is an associate member of the graduate faculty at WMU.

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Nation Science Foundation Logo EvaluATE is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant number 1841783. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed on this site are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.